Author Topic: Car No 6199 1921  (Read 21802 times)

jonto

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Car No 6199 1921
« on: December 02, 2015, 18:21:25 »
Long on going project, will post more as things progress-
   
   
« Last Edit: October 13, 2019, 15:38:29 by jonto »

dkp_cobra

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Car No 6199 1921
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2015, 06:33:37 »

jonto

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Car No 6199 1921
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2015, 11:37:38 »
Thank you Cobra, have it now[:)]

Old Crock

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Car No 6199 1921
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2015, 18:54:01 »
Thanks for the pic; a very early 4-cylinder (Anzani-engine), with single-pane windscreen (which has an exposed lower panel due to straight screen frame vs. curved bulkhead). No front wheel brakes, of course.
   
   Good luck with your rebuild and please keep us up to date. What's that next to it, an Alvis?

GSouthee

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Car No 6199 1921
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2015, 19:27:29 »
Very nice Car indeed.
Nothing is impossible, but sometimes it takes a different approach. Now anyone got a big hammer?

jonto

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Car No 6199 1921
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2015, 20:10:43 »
Yes next door 12/50 Alvis
   
     Engine No 2237, has piston type oil pump, exhaust manifold integral with block and priming taps in the head. Car is some 200 odd earlier than the four seater that used to be at Beaulieu, yet was registered some weeks later, third quarter  of 1921. Southampton registration, cast aluminum number plate bears a north London makers name.
     Almost ready to build the engine, just working on a test rig to run the oil pump.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2019, 14:18:10 by jonto »

Old Crock

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Car No 6199 1921
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2015, 23:20:56 »
Another feature that ages this vintage AC is the U-shaped headlamp brackets. Early cars, like this, also had one door only and a central running-board spare wheel. Here's a pic, and specification, from the 1922 brochure (it should be readable but might need downloading and enlarging). Note the oil consumption quoted - 600 miles per gallon (= a pint every 75 miles).
   
   
   

jonto

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Car No 6199 1921
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2015, 13:36:31 »
Headlamps from this car have adorned the front of 31225 for the last 40 years-
   
   
   
   The pistons have no oil rings, two substantial compression, then a groove with drain holes-
   
   
   The residue of the oil in the sump stuck to your skin like tar, almost impossible to scrub off!
   The valves have no guides, run direct in the iron block, unequal stem diameters, the inlets larger than the exhausts, perhaps Anzani's were using up old stock left over from their cancelled aero engine contracts. The amount of carbon deposit under the exhaust valve heads had to to seen to believe! Bit plasticy to not hard, benzol based fuels were popular I believe, not the volativity of today's fuel. I remember a picture of Birkin filling his Alfa during a TT, would be 1931 I guess, big funnel in the tank, emptying a churn into it, fuel sloshing all over and he has a fag in his mouth!
« Last Edit: October 13, 2019, 15:24:08 by jonto »

Old Crock

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Car No 6199 1921
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2015, 17:39:07 »
That is a very smart-looking car! A much later vintage 4-cyl, now with 2-doors, entry steps, and with the spare wheel mounted into the wing and running board. It has 4-wheel brakes, so probably around 1927 model and, interestingly, four stud hubs. Nice car Jonto!

jonto

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Car No 6199 1921
« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2015, 20:58:50 »
I sold 31225 over 30 years ago, don't know who has it now, picture from the Bath and West Show summer before last. It is a 1927 car registered 1st January.
   
   Connecting rod from the Anzani engine, minus white metal babbit bearing-
   
   
   Crankshaft assembly-
« Last Edit: October 14, 2019, 11:35:18 by jonto »

jonto

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Car No 6199 1921
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2015, 11:43:24 »
Crankcase and sump, piston type oil pump operates from an eccentric on the camshaft via a push rod and return spring-
   
« Last Edit: January 19, 2019, 16:56:16 by jonto »

BE774

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Car No 6199 1921
« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2015, 12:14:06 »
Great thread, please keep posting as progress is made! Graham.
Barbara

Old Crock

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Car No 6199 1921
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2015, 12:34:35 »
It would seem that the AC in the top photo (CR6208) is the oldest surviving 4-cylinder Anzani-engined AC and, indeed, is the oldest surviving vintage-period AC. Earlier AC's; only the few pre-WW1 Fivet-engined Edwardians and the Sociables and Box pre-date it.

jonto

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Car No 6199 1921
« Reply #13 on: December 05, 2015, 20:46:39 »
There may be an earlier car. I went with some friends in the 1970's to see one in the garden of a house at Neston on the Wirral, it had been replaced by a later car, a 1932 model I was told, I never saw this car as the owners were deceased and it had already been purchased from the estate. The earlier car had been turfed out into the open to weather the elements and was a bit distressed, I remember I could not find the car no plate but it was similar to the one I have so could have been earlier. I heard later that someone on holiday in the area was told about it and took the remains away, to Scotland I think.

jonto

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Car No 6199 1921
« Reply #14 on: December 06, 2015, 11:26:30 »
Back to 6199. Here is the last tax disc the car wore-
   
   
   Story is that the car was taken off the road because the engine was tightening. When I stripped it the big end bearings were mauled, the white metal cracked and breaking up. There was dirt in the sump, the piston type oil pump requires a none return valve to develop pressure, if there was dirt around and it was not seating there would be little or no oil circulation and I guess the big ends would be the first to suffer. The crankshaft journals are standard size 1-3/8th inch with little wear, same for the bores and pistons, 69mm.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2019, 14:48:46 by jonto »