Author Topic: BE 646  (Read 91339 times)

dkp_cobra

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BE 646
« on: March 21, 2011, 16:17:16 »
COMMENT:
   
   unfortunately, photobucket changed it's policy to 3rd party posting of picture. That's the reason why you will not see any pictures on the next 11 pages. But I generated a document where you can see the original content. Follwing the link you will find a PDF document: <u><font color="blue">https://c.1und1.de/362516207/Qk7IjtyMTCmCqPrexFGo5A</font id="blue"></u>
   
   Finally, BE 646 has found a new home and waits for its restauration:
   
   
« Last Edit: December 24, 2017, 11:15:29 by dkp_cobra »

Gus Meyjes

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BE 646
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2011, 20:25:08 »
Oh brotherly love! And with some fine onlookers in the back ground!!
   
   Gus

dkp_cobra

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BE 646
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2011, 16:53:53 »
What do I do with the Aceca? Well, I try to get it on the road. For that I had a lot of small jobs. Today, I installed a hazard switch. Not so easy to detect the right wires for the brake light switch and the flasher can in an unknown wire loom. Both must be disconnected from the ignition and must be connected to the hazyrd switch so that in the case of switched on ignition, switched on hazard switch and pushing the brake the hazard switch has the highest priority.
« Last Edit: December 24, 2017, 11:16:41 by dkp_cobra »

dkp_cobra

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BE 646
« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2011, 11:29:15 »
If you ever wanted to know what's inside of an Aceca door, it's wood:

And if you have used your car in rain during the last 50 years, it's dilapidated wood:
   
That gives the door some kind of flexibility [xx(]
« Last Edit: December 24, 2017, 11:18:28 by dkp_cobra »

Gus Meyjes

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« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2011, 13:54:16 »
wow,
   
   I was lucky I still had good wood...[;)]
   
   That will need the skills of a good cabinet maker in order to get the curves just right!
   
   Gus

AEX566

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BE 646
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2011, 00:07:07 »
As the door frame's not cosmetic wood, you might consider using the marine repair system for rotted wood: small holes are drilled in from above, then special thin penetrating epoxy that seeps into the wood is injected down filling holes using a syringe. This solution results in a solid, strong section. Beyond boat repair, this is often used for architectural restoration of bad windowsills and frames.  You'd save unwrapping the aluminum door skin at the bottom, and the result is as strong if not stronger than the original ash. Finish up by coating and sealing all the inside door wood with epoxy so moisture can't penetrate. Check boat repair vendors for correct epoxy; in the US one brand is Git-Rot. There are a number of You Tube videos to watch as well.
   If the door has sagged on the rear lower corner as the screws have loosened in the bad wood, use a Spanish windless to realign and then renew the corner ply. Of course if all the wood in the door is bad, go for the cabinet maker.
   Art

dkp_cobra

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BE 646
« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2011, 14:32:58 »
quote:
Originally posted by AEX566
   
As the door frame's not cosmetic wood, you might consider using the marine repair system for rotted wood: small holes are drilled in from above, then special thin penetrating epoxy that seeps into the wood is injected down filling holes using a syringe. This solution results in a solid, strong section. Beyond boat repair, this is often used for architectural restoration of bad windowsills and frames.  You'd save unwrapping the aluminum door skin at the bottom, and the result is as strong if not stronger than the original ash. Finish up by coating and sealing all the inside door wood with epoxy so moisture can't penetrate. Check boat repair vendors for correct epoxy; in the US one brand is Git-Rot. There are a number of You Tube videos to watch as well.
   If the door has sagged on the rear lower corner as the screws have loosened in the bad wood, use a Spanish windless to realign and then renew the corner ply. Of course if all the wood in the door is bad, go for the cabinet maker.
   Art
   

   
   Art,
   
   thank you for your advice. When the time has come to make the doors I will check the possibility. Currently, I am working on small items in order to get the car on the road.
   
   Regards,
   
   Peter

dkp_cobra

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BE 646
« Reply #7 on: August 11, 2011, 14:39:39 »
I think I know why the speedometer doesn't work. Maybe it's this strange looking elbow gear at the transmission:
   
This should work better:
   
   Now, I have two questions:
   
   1) is it normal that the hand brake lever is not covered:
      
   2) Is this the normal transmission of an Aceca or something else:
   
« Last Edit: December 24, 2017, 11:20:05 by dkp_cobra »

Robin A Woolmer

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BE 646
« Reply #8 on: August 11, 2011, 16:20:01 »
Handbrake looks none standard & the Moss Box appears from a Jag MK2 but i am not an Aceca Specialist.
   Robin

dkp_cobra

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« Reply #9 on: August 11, 2011, 16:31:02 »
quote:
Originally posted by Robin A Woolmer
   
Handbrake looks none standard & the Moss Box appears from a Jag MK2 but i am not an Aceca Specialist.
   Robin
   

   
   The engine is a Daimler 2.5 V8. This may fit the Jag MK2 Moss Box.

bex316

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« Reply #10 on: August 12, 2011, 01:05:18 »
The handbrake lever and its operating mechanism look standard Ace/Aceca to me but the tower on which it is mounted does not look familiar to me.
   The operating mechanism should be covered with a piece of carpet, actually consisting of 3 pieces sewn together (upper part and 2 sides). The upper part should have an opening at the front through which the lever can slide up and down.
   
   Jerry

dkp_cobra

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BE 646
« Reply #11 on: August 12, 2011, 16:08:22 »
quote:
Originally posted by bex316
   
The handbrake lever and its operating mechanism look standard Ace/Aceca to me but the tower on which it is mounted does not look familiar to me.
   The operating mechanism should be covered with a piece of carpet, actually consisting of 3 pieces sewn together (upper part and 2 sides). The upper part should have an opening at the front through which the lever can slide up and down.
   
   Jerry
   

   
   Jerry,
   
   please, can you send me a picture of this cover?
   
   Peter

dkp_cobra

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BE 646
« Reply #12 on: August 25, 2011, 09:39:03 »
Yes, it's a shame but this will be the new drive-train:
   
   A 1964 289 cid Ford with a top-loader.
« Last Edit: December 24, 2017, 11:20:54 by dkp_cobra »

Gus Meyjes

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BE 646
« Reply #13 on: August 25, 2011, 15:48:30 »
not a shame if you did not have the original motor anyway... be sure to beef up the rest of the drive train.
   
   Gus

dkp_cobra

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BE 646
« Reply #14 on: August 25, 2011, 16:05:35 »
quote:
Originally posted by Gus Meyjes
   
not a shame if you did not have the original motor anyway... be sure to beef up the rest of the drive train.
   
   Gus
   

   
   I plan to use a Jag diff. and there are some drive shafts from my MK IV laying around [:)]