Author Topic: BE 646  (Read 112241 times)

dkp_cobra

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BE 646
« on: March 21, 2011, 16:17:16 »
This thread describes my attempt to restore my AC Aceca BE 646. The journey started on 2011/03 and after nine years it's still not finished but I'll try to keep on doing it.
In the meantime the new AC Aceca owner David (https://www.acownersclub.co.uk/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=28224) started to make an index and a table of content for my thread. This is a great (and painful) job and he allowed me to use his work to publish it here. This is a very helpful document and I would like to thank him very much. Thank you, David.


RESTORATION OF BE646 2011 - TO DATE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
The pages are hyperlinks. Click them you will like it ...
# = message number   (p. x-y) = number of photo in separate document https://c.1und1.de/362516207/Qk7IjtyMTCmCqPrexFGo5A
  Page 1:
            #2 (p. 1): left side in fwd cabin
            #3 p. (3-4): inside right hand door
            #4-6: wood repairs
            #7-11 (p. 14/455): speedometer drive, parking brake handle
            #12 (p. 13/455): Ford 289+toploader
Page 2:
            #20: Aceca as bought
            #25 (p. 19/455): cabin overhead light, panels behind seat, rear frame
            #28 (p. 20-21): rear frame
            #28 (p. 22): fuel tank mounting and rear frame
            #28 (p. 27-28): engine compartment looking fwd and backwards
            #28 (p. 29): front disk and caliper
            #29: motor weights
Page 3:
            #30-31: motor weights
            #33-36: (p. 32-35): seats
            #36 (p. 36): fuel tank
            #37: tail lights and body
            #40 (p. 43): right B pillar
Page 4:
            #46 (p. 47-48): left B pillar, rear framing
            #52 (p. 50-52): frame and rockers
            #54: hand brake
            #55 (p. 53-58): rear framing
            #57 (p. 59): front framing
            #58: A pillar
            #59 (p. 63): footboxes, dash etc (RH drive), rear frame
Page 5:
            #60-61: tachometer drive
            #62 (p. 63-66): rear frame and differential etc
            #65 (p. 68-69):  rear body, B pillars
            #68: differential
            #69 (p. 70-71): MGA heater
            #70 (p. 72-73): wiper wiring
            #71 (p. 73): seats
            #73: differential brackets
            #74, 77 (p. 76-81): windshield wiper motor and mechanism
Page 6:
            #77: wiper R and R
            #78 (p. 83): driveshafts (MkIV, new Aceca, original Aceca)
            #82 (p. 88-96): Jag differential mounting etc
            #85-87: stub axles
            #89 (p. 97): horns
Page 7:
            #90: horns
            #91-93 (p. 99-105): Jag differential mounting
            #93: differential mounting
            #94 (p. 105-110): mounting 289 and toploader
            #96 (p. 112-113): pedal box, washer wheels
            #97 (p. 113-119): engine mounts
            #97-104 (p. 119-123): steering gear
Page 8:
            #105-107: steering conversion discussion
            #108 (p. 124): seat redo
            #109 (p. 125): rack and pinion mountings
            #112-113: frame strength measurement/analysis
            #114-119: (p. 130-140): steering discussion and X-ray
            #114-119: rack-and-pinion mount
            #119: rack and pinion conversion
Page 9:
            #120 (p. 140-151): steering column bracket, differential, half shaft, transmission-mounts
            #122: gearbox bracket
            #123: ACOC badge R&R
            #124: converting Holley carburetor to manual choke
            #125-126: speedometer drive
            #127 (p. 157-158): headers, door fix, hatch
            #128 (p. 158): hatch
            #129 (p. 164): heater vents
            #132 (p. 167): clutch and brake fluid reservoirs
            #133 (p. 169-170): frame modifications to fit motor and gearbox
            #134 (p. 170-171): bumpers
            #134 (p. 172-173): motor mounts
Page 10:
            #135 (p. 176-177): steering shaft
            #136-138 (p. 177-186): LH drive dashboard
            #138-141 (p. 187-190): differential bracket
            #141 (p.191-194): dash binnacle
            #146 (p. 195): parking brake handle
Page 11:
            #151-152: re-chroming
            #152 (p. 199-200): cabin light
            #153-156 (p. 201-213): dash and footbox modifications for 289
            #157 (p. 216-220): headers
            #158-159: dash, glove box
Page 12:
            #165-166 (p. 221-238): dash and footbox modifications
            #168 (p. 239-240): differential rebuild
            #169 (p. 240-243): rear view mirror
            #171 (p. 243-245): differential rebuild
            #171-172 (p. 246-252): footboxes and pedal box
            #172 (p. 252-253): foot box air vents
            #178 (p. 254-255): transverse brace for preventing engine mount rotation (note that mounts are clamped, not welded to the frame to be able to change motors)
Page 13:
            #181 (p. 255-261): footbox modifications
            #181 (p. 261-267): borescope examination of inside frame tubes and discussion of strengthening needs
            #187 (p. 271-273): removing running gear/A arms/suspension
            #189 (p. 276): stripped body
            #190 (p. 277): differential gears
            #192 (p. 278-280): stripped body including inside roof above doors
            #194 (p. 281-286): improved engine mounts
Page 14:
            #196 (p. 287): reproduction VIN plate
            #197 (p. 288): footboxes
            #197-202 (p. 288-309): frame strength analysis and reinforcing tube insertion
            #202-204 (p. 312-317): another improved engine-mount to brace frame alignment
            #205 (p. 318-321): closing frame holes
            #206-207 (p. 322-325): rocker repairs
            #208 (p. 326-331): rear frame (behind seats) repairs
Page 15:
            #210 (p. 332-333): discussion about removing rear of body
            #211-213 (p. 334-338): rear frame repairs and how to do them
            #216 (p. 342-345): shock absorber brackets & others
            #217 (p. 347-348): bracket for spare wheel fixing rod
            #218 (p. 349): rear subframe complete
            #219-221 (p. 350): fitting fuel tank, repairing frame to suit. Discussion of A-arm bracket alignment misalignment etc
            #222-224 (p. 356-366): right and left rocker repairs
Page 16:
            #225 (p.366-369): frame repairs behind seats, fitting fiberglass panel
            #226 (p. 370): seat runner supports
            #226 (p. 370-372): B-column brace
            #227 (p. 372-374): rear subframe installation
            #228-229 (p. 375-380): improved engine mounts, drive shaft protection loop
            #231 (p. 380-385): rocker panel repair and replacement
            #232-233 (p. 385-393): door fitting, hinges, and B pillar repair
            #234-238 (p. 394-400): B-pillar bracing panels
Page 17:
            #239-244 B pillar bracing panels
            #245 (p. 400-403): rocker covers
            #246 (p. 404-405): fuel tank straps
            #247 (p. 406-410): better B pillar covers
            #248-249 (p. 410-414): hatch window
            #250 (p. 415-419): front lower wishbone R&R
            #251 (p. 420-422): fiberglass panel behind seats
            #252-253 (p. 423-429):  hatch R&R
            #254 (p. 429-455) door rebuilding, fitting, finding car VIN stamped in door
Page 18:
            #256-267 door rebuilding and fitting, window frames       
Page 19:
            #271: front quarter window latches
            #273: door fitting
            #279: grease gun R&R
            #280: door frames and inside panels
            #281: seat belt anchor brackets
            #282: transmission tunnel
            #283: floor panels
Page 20:
            #285-291: panels for boot (trunk)
            #292: seat runners
            #293-294: brackets to fix the panel behind the seats
            #294: shoulder belt brackets
            #295: Motor change to Ford Zephyr and gearbox, strip
            #296: Zephyr cylinder head rebuild
            #299: flywheel, clutch plate, clutch cover rebuilds
           
Page 21:
            #300: Ford Zephyr motor and gearbox, installation
            #303: doors (foot box modifications, motor changed a Ford Zephyr), boot panels
            #304: rear inner wing panels
            #305: inner fender screens
            #313: floor panels and transmission tunnel (for different transmission)
            #314: radiator, cooling fan, inner fender panels
Page 22:
            #315: door jamb A-pillar panels
            #316: rocker panel reconstruction
            #317: “exploded” internal panels
            #318: stripped car with rear and roof remaining over frame
            #319: rebuilding front frame, Zephyr exhaust routing through floor outriggers
            #320: front brake line brackets, ENV differential mounting
            #321: removable inner front fender liners, battery tray
            #322: Zephyr muffler fitting, pedal box fitting
            #323: pedal box construction & fitting, battery tray fitting, heating system
            #324: heater installation
            #325: Zephyr muffler brackets, exhaust pipes
            #326: Zephyr header construction, exhaust pipes
            #327: A pillar base reconstruction



OK, let's start ....
   
« Last Edit: June 27, 2020, 15:26:56 by dkp_cobra »

Gus Meyjes

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BE 646
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2011, 20:25:08 »
Oh brotherly love! And with some fine onlookers in the back ground!!
   
   Gus

dkp_cobra

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BE 646
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2011, 16:53:53 »
 
RESTORATION OF BE646 2011 - TO DATE (16 JUNE 2020)
SUBJECT INDEX

# = message number   (p. x-y) = number of photo in separate linked pages at https://c.1und1.de/362516207/Qk7IjtyMTCmCqPrexFGo5A
 
 
Battery Box   
            #321: battery tray
            #323: battery tray fitting
Body Panel Repairs
            #189 (p. 276): stripped body
            #192: stripped body
            #210 (p. 332-333): discussion about removing roof and rear of body
            #318: stripped car with rear and roof remaining over frame
            #192 (p. 278-280): stripped body including inside roof above doors
            #317: “exploded” panels
            #196 (p. 287): reproduction VIN plate
            A Pillars
            #315: A pillar repairs
            #327: A pillar base replacement
            B Pillars
            #40 (p. 43): right door jamb
            #65 (p. 68-69):  door jambs
            #226: B pillar braces
            #232-233 (p. 385-393): B pillar repair
            #234-238 (p. 394-400): B pillar bracing panels
            #239-244: B pillar bracing panels
            #247 (p. 406-410): better B pillar covers and bracing
            Bonnet
            #157: before and after repairs
            Boot (trunk) panels
            #46: repairs needed
            #285-291: making panels for boot                 
            #294: old and new boot panels exploded
            #303: boot panels
            #305: boot panels and spare wheel cover
            Fender panels and screens
            #304: rear inner fender wing panels
            #305: inner front fender screens and wing panels
            #314: inner fender panels in front of radiator
            #321: removable inner front fender liners
            Floor Panels
            #283: floor panels
            #303: floors (Zephyr)
            #313: stronger floor panels (for Zephyr transmission)
            Panel behind seats
            #25 (p. 20-21): panels behind seats
            #225 (p.366-369): fitting fiberglass panel
            #251 (p. 420-422): fiberglass panel behind seats
            #293-294: brackets to attach the panel behind the seats
            Rear Body Panel Replacement
            #213
            Rocker (Door Sill) Panels
            #206: sill repairs
            #222-224 (p. 356-366): right and left door sill repairs
            #231 (p. 380-385): rocker panel repair and replacement
            #245 (p. 400-403): rocker covers
            #303: rocker fitting
            #316: rocker panel reconstruction
            Transmission Tunnel
            #282: transmission tunnel
            #283: transmission tunnel
            #313: transmission tunnel (for Zephyr transmission)
Brakes
            #28 (p. 29): front disk and caliper
            #320: front brake line brackets
            Parking brake
            #7 (p. 14/455): parking brake handle
            #10: description of stock arrangement
            #52: as bought
            #54: as bought
            #56: originality of mount
            #134: handle
            #146: handle
            #186: complete assembly
Bumpers
            #211: rear bumper brackets   
            #134 (p. 170-171): bumpers
Cabin
            Dashboard     
            #59 (p. 63): dash etc (RH drive)
            #136-139 (p. 177-186): LH drive dashboard
            #141 (p.191-194): dash binnacle
            #153-156 (p. 201-213): dash
            #158-166 (p. 221-238): dash
            #291: aluminum dash
            Footboxes
            #28: RH drive footboxes
            #59 (p. 63): footboxes (RH drive)
            #153-156 (p. 201-213): footbox modifications for 289
            #158-166 (p. 221-238): footbox modifications
            #171-172 (p. 246-252): footboxes
            #181 (p. 255-261): footbox modifications for clutch lever
            #197 (p. 288): footboxes
            #303: foot boxes for a Ford Zephyr 6
            Interior           
            #2 p. 1: left side in front of cabin
            #25 p. 19/455: cabin overhead light
            #152 (p. 199-200): cabin light
            Parking brake: See brakes above
            Pedal Box
            #59: pedals
            #96 (p. 112-113): pedal box
            #171-172 (p. 246-252): pedal box
            #172: gas pedal
            #186: throttle pedal bracket finished
            #322: pedal box fitting
            #323: pedal box construction & fitting
            Rear View Mirror
            #169 (p. 240-243): rear view mirror
            Seats
            #33 (p. 32-35): seats
            #71 (p. 73): seats
            #108 (p. 124): seat redo
            #292: seat runners
            Seat Belts
            #281: seat belt anchor brackets
            #294: shoulder belt brackets
Carburetor
            #124: converting Holley Street Avenger to manual choke
Differential
            #62 (p. 63-66): rear frame and differential, ENV vs Jaguar differentials
            #68: weights
            #73: brackets
            #82 (p. 88-96): Jaguar differential mounting brackets
            #89: differential brackets
            #91 (p. 99-105): Jaguar differential mounting
            #93-94: differential mounting
            #120 (p. 140-151): differential, drive shaft, transmission mounts
            #122: differential mounts
            #139-141 (p. 187-190): upper differential bracket
            #168 (p. 239-240): differential rebuild
            #171 (p. 243-245): differential rebuild
            #186: finished brackets
            #190-191 (p. 277): differential gears and ratios
            #320: ENV differential for Zephyr
Doors
            #3: as bought inner right side door
            #127 (p. 157-158): door fixes
            #232-233 (p. 385-393): door fitting, hinges
            #245: door sill fabrication and replacement
            #254 (p. 429-455): door rebuilding, fitting, and car VIN stamped in door
            #256-267: door rebuilding and fitting
            #264: window frames
            #271: front quarter window latches
            #273: adjustable door brace and door fitting adjustment
            #280: door frame and inside panels
            #303: doors and window frame mounts
            #303: front quarter windows
Drive Shafts
            #78: (p. 83): drive shafts (MkIV, new Aceca, original Aceca)
            #84-85: half shaft sources
            #120: Kirkham driveshaft
            #312: Zephyr drive shaft
Exhaust
            #319: exhaust routing through floor outriggers (Zephyr)
            #322: muffler and exhaust pipe fitting (Zephyr and all others)
            #325: muffler brackets (Zephyr)
Frame
            #5 wood repair using epoxy
            #56: alloy body nailed to framing
            #28 (p. 27-28): engine compartment looking fwd and backwards
            #46 (p. 47-48): rear framing & B pillars
            #52 (p. 50-52): frame and rockers
            #55 (p. 53-58): rear framing
            #57 (p. 59): front framing
            #57: frame rust prevention
            #59: looking back at rear frame from between doors
            #62 (p. 63-66): rear frame and differential mounts
            #112-113: determining strength of main frame tubes
            #181 (p. 261-267): borescope examination of inside frame tubes and discussion of strengthening needs
            #182-185: frame strength discussions
            #197-202 (p. 288-309): frame strength analysis and reinforcing tube insertion
            #199: old reinforcement tube for differential mounts
            #203: front subframe
            #204-205 (p. 318-321): closing frame holes
            #206-207 (p. 322-325): rocker repairs
            #208: upper rear shock mounts
            #211-213 (p. 334-338): rear frame repairs and how to do them
            #208 (p. 326-331): rear frame (behind seats) repairs
            #217 (p. 347-348): bracket for spare wheel fixing rod
            #221: alignment discussion
            #222: closing main frame tubes
            #222-224: sill frame reconstruction
            #225 (p.366-369): frame repairs behind seats
            #226 (p. 370): seat runner supports
            #226 (p. 370-372): B column brace
            #227: rear subframe
            #218 (p. 349): rear subframe complete
            #227 (p. 372-374): rear subframe installation
            #293: brackets to attached panel behind seats
            #315: door jamb A pillar panels
            #316: right side rocker repairs
            #317: front frame exposed
            #319: rebuilding front frame
Fuel Tank
            #25 (p. 22): fuel tank mounting and rear frame
            #36 (p. 36): fuel tank internal plumbing
            #219: interference with A arm brackets
            #219-221 (p. 350): fitting fuel tank, repairing frame to suit.
            #246 (p. 404-405): fuel tank straps
            #294: installed
            #322: modifying fuel tank for Zephyr
Gearbox and Clutch
            #12: Ford 289 V8 and toploader
            #96: toploader in car
            #120: gearbox with drive shaft
            #120: half shafts
            #122: gearbox bracket
            #133: gearbox etc in car
            #295: Zephyr gearbox
            #299: Ford Type 9 gearbox
            #299: clutch and flywheel
            #300: Zephyr and gearbox
            #300: fitting gearbox to frame and footboxes
            #309: bell housing for Ford Type 9
Grease Gun
            #279: R&R
Hatch 
            #127: as bought
            #128 (p. 158): hatch
            #248-249 (p. 410-414): hatch window and fitting
            #252-253 (p. 423-429):  hatch R&R
            #253: hatch lock mount
Headers
            For 289
            #127: header on motor
            #133: new headers
            #133: mounting motor with headers
            #134: header problem with motor mount
            #157 (p. 216-220): making headers
            For Zephyr
            #326: header construction
Heater            & Ventilation
            #69 (p. 70-71): MGA heater and duct
            #129 (p. 164): heater vents
            #172 (p. 252-253): foot box air vents
            #186: ducts
            #323: original heating system ducts
            #324: heater fitting and mounts (for Zephyr)
            #324: ducts
Horns
            #89 (p. 97): horns
Lights
            #37: tail lights
Instruments
            #7: speedometer drive
            #60-61: speedometer cable discussion
            #125: speedometer cable discussion
            #142-145: speedometer and tachometer mounting in binnacle
Motors
            #12 (p. 13/455): Ford 289 and toploader
            #28: 289 vs Daimler V8
            #29-31: comparing motor weights
            Carburetor
            #124: converting Holley Street Avenger to manual choke
            Zephyr
            #295: Ford Zephyr Mk II motor and gearbox
            #295: stripping block
            #296: stripping head
            #297: flywheel, friction plate, clutch cover
            #300: Zephyr motor and gearbox much longer and narrower than 289 and toploader
            #300-302: fitting Zephyr in car
            #306: Zephyr connecting rods
            #307: valve gear, water pump, oil filter
            #308: assembling intake and carburetors
            #308: fitting in car
            #311: distributor and ignition system
            #312: accessory brackets, oil pan, oil temp sensor, engine mounts, drive shaft
            #312: starter
Motor and Gearbox Mounts
            #94 (p. 105-110): mounting 289 and toploader
            #97 (p. 113-119): engine mounts
            #120: motor mount
            #133  (p. 169-170): frame modifications to fit motor and gearbox
            #133: mounting motor and transmission in car
            #134 (p. 172-173): motor mounts
            #178 (p. 254-255): transverse brace for preventing engine mount rotation (note that mounts are clamped, not welded, to the frame to make motor change possible)
            #194 (p. 281-286): improved engine mounts
            #202-204 (p. 312-317): another improved engine mount to brace frame alignment
            #228-229 (p. 375-380): improved engine mounts
            #229-230: drive shaft safety loop
            #309: Ford Type 9 gearbox fitting
Radiator
            #28: radiator and fan
            #314: radiator
            Cooling Fan
            #314: cooling fan
Replating
            #151-152 various parts before and after
Reservoirs     
            #132) (p. 167): clutch and brake fluid reservoirs
Steering
            #98-100 (p. 119-123): steering gear
            #102-107: rack and pinion conversion discussion
            #109 (p. 125): rack and pinion mountings
            #119: steering
            #123: steering rack placement
            #114-118: steering discussions
            #118 (p. 130-140): steering discussion and x-ray
            #120: steering shaft mount
            #135 (p. 176-177): steering shaft location
            #172: steering column mounting bracket
            #178: steering shaft mounting
            #186: upper steering column bracket
Suspension
            #187 (p. 271-273): removing running gear/A arms (wishbones)/suspension
            #208: upper rear shock mounts
            #216 (p. 342-345): shock absorber bracket repairs & others
            #216: right rear lower A-arm bracket repairs
            #219: right rear lower A-arm bracket repairs
            #220: front lower A-arm brackets and repairs
            #219-221 (p. 350): discussion of A-arm bracket alignment misalignment etc
            #250 (p. 415-419): rear right lower A-arm bracket repair and modification
            #250: front A-arm stiffening
            #251: finished rear A-arms
Washer:
            #96: wheelbox R&R
Weights
            #30-31: motor and gearbox weights
Wheels
            #51: wheel specifications
Wiper
            #70 (p. 72-73): wiper wiring
            #74, 77 (p. 76-81): windshield wiper motor and mechanism
Zephyr:
            #295: motor and gearbox
            #296: motor
            #299: clutch and flywheel
            #300: motor and gearbox
            #300: motor vs 289
            #300: motor and gearbox in car
            #300: new transmission tunnel
            #309: bell housing for Ford Type 9 gearbox
            #312: in car
 


What do I do with the Aceca? Well, I try to get it on the road. For that I had a lot of small jobs. Today, I installed a hazard switch. Not so easy to detect the right wires for the brake light switch and the flasher can in an unknown wire loom. Both must be disconnected from the ignition and must be connected to the hazyrd switch so that in the case of switched on ignition, switched on hazard switch and pushing the brake the hazard switch has the highest priority.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2020, 15:47:08 by dkp_cobra »

dkp_cobra

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« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2011, 11:29:15 »
If you ever wanted to know what's inside of an Aceca door, it's wood:

And if you have used your car in rain during the last 50 years, it's dilapidated wood:
   
That gives the door some kind of flexibility [xx(]
« Last Edit: December 24, 2017, 11:18:28 by dkp_cobra »

Gus Meyjes

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« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2011, 13:54:16 »
wow,
   
   I was lucky I still had good wood...[;)]
   
   That will need the skills of a good cabinet maker in order to get the curves just right!
   
   Gus

AEX566

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« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2011, 00:07:07 »
As the door frame's not cosmetic wood, you might consider using the marine repair system for rotted wood: small holes are drilled in from above, then special thin penetrating epoxy that seeps into the wood is injected down filling holes using a syringe. This solution results in a solid, strong section. Beyond boat repair, this is often used for architectural restoration of bad windowsills and frames.  You'd save unwrapping the aluminum door skin at the bottom, and the result is as strong if not stronger than the original ash. Finish up by coating and sealing all the inside door wood with epoxy so moisture can't penetrate. Check boat repair vendors for correct epoxy; in the US one brand is Git-Rot. There are a number of You Tube videos to watch as well.
   If the door has sagged on the rear lower corner as the screws have loosened in the bad wood, use a Spanish windless to realign and then renew the corner ply. Of course if all the wood in the door is bad, go for the cabinet maker.
   Art

dkp_cobra

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« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2011, 14:32:58 »
quote:
Originally posted by AEX566
   
As the door frame's not cosmetic wood, you might consider using the marine repair system for rotted wood: small holes are drilled in from above, then special thin penetrating epoxy that seeps into the wood is injected down filling holes using a syringe. This solution results in a solid, strong section. Beyond boat repair, this is often used for architectural restoration of bad windowsills and frames.  You'd save unwrapping the aluminum door skin at the bottom, and the result is as strong if not stronger than the original ash. Finish up by coating and sealing all the inside door wood with epoxy so moisture can't penetrate. Check boat repair vendors for correct epoxy; in the US one brand is Git-Rot. There are a number of You Tube videos to watch as well.
   If the door has sagged on the rear lower corner as the screws have loosened in the bad wood, use a Spanish windless to realign and then renew the corner ply. Of course if all the wood in the door is bad, go for the cabinet maker.
   Art
   

   
   Art,
   
   thank you for your advice. When the time has come to make the doors I will check the possibility. Currently, I am working on small items in order to get the car on the road.
   
   Regards,
   
   Peter

dkp_cobra

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« Reply #7 on: August 11, 2011, 14:39:39 »
I think I know why the speedometer doesn't work. Maybe it's this strange looking elbow gear at the transmission:
   
This should work better:
   
   Now, I have two questions:
   
   1) is it normal that the hand brake lever is not covered:
      
   2) Is this the normal transmission of an Aceca or something else:
   
« Last Edit: December 24, 2017, 11:20:05 by dkp_cobra »

Robin A Woolmer

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« Reply #8 on: August 11, 2011, 16:20:01 »
Handbrake looks none standard & the Moss Box appears from a Jag MK2 but i am not an Aceca Specialist.
   Robin

dkp_cobra

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« Reply #9 on: August 11, 2011, 16:31:02 »
quote:
Originally posted by Robin A Woolmer
   
Handbrake looks none standard & the Moss Box appears from a Jag MK2 but i am not an Aceca Specialist.
   Robin
   

   
   The engine is a Daimler 2.5 V8. This may fit the Jag MK2 Moss Box.

bex316

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« Reply #10 on: August 12, 2011, 01:05:18 »
The handbrake lever and its operating mechanism look standard Ace/Aceca to me but the tower on which it is mounted does not look familiar to me.
   The operating mechanism should be covered with a piece of carpet, actually consisting of 3 pieces sewn together (upper part and 2 sides). The upper part should have an opening at the front through which the lever can slide up and down.
   
   Jerry

dkp_cobra

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« Reply #11 on: August 12, 2011, 16:08:22 »
quote:
Originally posted by bex316
   
The handbrake lever and its operating mechanism look standard Ace/Aceca to me but the tower on which it is mounted does not look familiar to me.
   The operating mechanism should be covered with a piece of carpet, actually consisting of 3 pieces sewn together (upper part and 2 sides). The upper part should have an opening at the front through which the lever can slide up and down.
   
   Jerry
   

   
   Jerry,
   
   please, can you send me a picture of this cover?
   
   Peter

dkp_cobra

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« Reply #12 on: August 25, 2011, 09:39:03 »
Yes, it's a shame but this will be the new drive-train:
   
   A 1964 289 cid Ford with a top-loader.
« Last Edit: December 24, 2017, 11:20:54 by dkp_cobra »

Gus Meyjes

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« Reply #13 on: August 25, 2011, 15:48:30 »
not a shame if you did not have the original motor anyway... be sure to beef up the rest of the drive train.
   
   Gus

dkp_cobra

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« Reply #14 on: August 25, 2011, 16:05:35 »
quote:
Originally posted by Gus Meyjes
   
not a shame if you did not have the original motor anyway... be sure to beef up the rest of the drive train.
   
   Gus
   

   
   I plan to use a Jag diff. and there are some drive shafts from my MK IV laying around [:)]